The Weekly Pokedex [8] – Roserade

…Or the (mostly) weekly Pokedex as I should perhaps start calling it.

The roll for this week is #407 – Roserade, AKA the ブ-ケポケモン. Hey, it sounds almost exactly like in English.

ROSERADE

Nothing interesting to say about the name this time, since they’re the same in both languages! What we’ll be looking for is the HeartGold/SoulSilver Dex entry, and through it you may find that Roserade is not as innocent as it looks…

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The Weekly Pokedex [7] – Cofagrigus

Welcome to this week’s… well… Weekly Pokedex. Today it’ll get a bit spooky, as our roll happens to be #563, AKA Cofagrigus!

COFAGRIGUS

Not much to say here this time, as its Japanese name is fairly straightforward. It’s, most likely, a combination of デス (death) and (coffin). Though for some reason the vowel in 棺 is elongated. The real fun starts with the entry itself, though.


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The Weekly Pokedex [6] – Beedrill

Hello! Sorry for another delay, but last week I actually went to another city in order to take the JLPT. I don’t intend to make this a “bi-weekly Pokedex” or anything like that, so from now on I’ll try sticking to an actual weekly schedule for real ・ω・

Anyway, the Pokedex number for today is 15, AKA Beedrill.

BEEDRILL

So, Beedrill is classified as a どくばち (poison bee) Pokemon. Before we get any further with this, let me just talk about Beedrill’s Japanese name for a bit. Sure, the English name might be a simple mash-up of “bee” and “drill”, but the Japanese name…

…is just “Spear”.

mesa_verde_spear_and_knife

Y’know, stick with pointy end?

Well, Beedrill is just one of many Gen 1 Pokemon with similarly bland names, but that’s a topic for another blog post. Let’s move on to the actual Pokedex entry (from Emerald this time around).

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The Weekly Pokedex [5] – Wynaut

Sorry for not putting up a new post last week, by I was a bit busy with exams (´・ω・`)

This week, however, we’re back on track with number 360 – Wynaut.

WYNAUT

Wynaut is a fun Pokemon, if only because of its name. In English, it’s obviously a pun on “why not?” In Japanese, though, it’s a pun on そうなの?(is that so?) That’s why Wynaut is one of the few Pokemon able to experience the pleasure of being a meme.

Wynaut is classified as ほがらか (bright) Pokemon.

Now, on to the Pokedex entry itself! We’ll be looking at the entry from Emerald here.

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The Weekly Pokedex [4] – Ferrothorn

This week’s roll is #598, which is another Gen V Mon – Ferrothorn! If you’ve battled online recently, chances are you see this thing all the dang time. On the other hand, I imagine it doesn’t see too much use in-game, since that 20 base speed is painful.  But, I mean, who expects a metal-covered plant to be fast?

Anyway, I decided to take a look at its Pokemon White Pokedex entry!

FERROTHORN

I’m actually not 100% sure where Ferrothorn’s Japanese name comes from. I mean, the ナット part obviously just means “nut,” but the レイ part? No clue.

Ferrothorn is classified as a とげだま (spiky ball) Pokemon.

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The Weekly Pokedex [3] – Lickilicky

It’s already the third entry in the series of dissecting Japanese Pokedex entries, and the number for today is  463 – Lickilicky.

Lickilicky is the Gen IV evolution of a Gen I Pokemon, Lickitung. This Pokemon family has always… disturbed me, a little, for some reason.

Perhaps it’s something about the long, sticky tongue and paralyzing saliva. Yeah.

Baron_Alberto_Lickilicky_Hyper_Beam.png

And on top of it all it can also learn Flamethrower

Lickilicky’s Japanese name, ベロベルト comes from, what a surprise ベロ (tongue). Its name is also used as a pun in the Rise of Darkrai movie, where, spoilers, Baron Alberto ends up transformed into a Lickilicky. Alberto and ベロベルト.

LICKILICKY

Anyway, let’s move on to the Pokedex entry!

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The Weekly Pokedex [2] – Sewaddle

Hello and welcome to the second entry of the Weekly Pokedex series (^O^)/

The RNG roll for today is… 540! The Pokemon with the National Dex. number of 540 happens to be Sewaddle, one of Generation V’s bug Pokemon.

You’ll likely run into it a lot in the tall grass of early-game Pokemon Black and White, so Sewaddle might seem unremarkable, but let’s take a look at what the Pokedex has to say about it.

(By the way, if you’ve been wondering what the Pokedex is called in Japanese – it’s ポケモン図鑑. 図鑑 refers to an illustrated reference book or a field guide.)

SEWADDLE

First, we should talk about its name. Unlike in Granbull’s case, Sewaddle’s Japanese name is different from the English one. クルミル might be based on the word 包む to wrap up (which would be fitting, as we’ll see from the Pokedex entry in a moment.) There’s also a possibility it’s derived from 胡桃 walnut.

Sewaddle is a dual むし (bug) and くさ (grass) type. It’s classified as a さいほうポケモン. 裁縫 = sewing

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The Weekly Pokedex – Granbull

I’ve been thinking of starting a little series on this blog which I’m tentatively calling the Weekly Pokedex.

What this means, basically, is that each week, I will use the random number generator to pick a number from 1 to  721 (which is the total number of Pokemon that exist as of right now – though that’s going to change soon) Whichever number I get, I’ll take a close look at this Pokemon’s Japanese Pokedex entry and analyze it, for the purpose of, perhaps, learning a little bit of Japanese grammar and vocab.

Note that this series might require at least some very basic understanding of how Japanese works, or these posts might not make a whole lot of sense. I also won’t be using any romaji!

For our first Pokemon of the Week, the number I got was 210, which is… *drumroll*

Granbull! Let’s see what the Pokedex has to say about this one.

GRANBULL

I’d take a look at the Pokemon’s name first, but Granbull’s Japanese name is identical to the English one, so nothing to talk about here!

Granbull is classified as a ようせいポケモン. 妖精 means fairy. Before the GenVI games it was a Normal type, but now, fittingly it is a フェアリー (fairy) type.


Now, let’s break down the Pokedex entry (which is the one from Gold/Leaf Green, btw)

(Note: mouse-over words in kanji to see their readings!)

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